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BUILDING A MORE COMPASSIONATE FUTURE

The Human Cooperation Project

The Human Cooperation Project

Mounting evidence is making it apparent that cortisol rhythmicity exhibits nonlinear properties. This is immediately relevant to brain-mapping projects and, more importantly, may profoundly affect our overall understanding of human cooperative behavior. The relative importance of the emerging insights builds on an understanding that disruptions to cortisol rhythmicity underlie individuals’ response to stress, where efforts to restore stability at the cellular molecular level may involve activity which is highly structured and coordinated on massively different levels of scale, including individual and community behavior that increasingly displays a global reach. If we are correct in understanding that this comprehensive set of behavioral relationships depends on nonlinear properties as an organizing principle, then we have a powerful set of tools with which to creatively approach many important challenges facing the emergence of a global community.

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Our past conferences have brought together doctors, chaplains, social workers, psychologists, nurses, and those who serve in the military around the common cause of integrating practical applications of whole person care.  In 2017 we will continue this annual tradition of featuring leading interdisciplinary voices in transformational experience.  Past speakers have included Harold Koenig, Kenneth Pargament, Vincent Felitti, Michael King, George Slavich, Stephen Post, Steven Cole, Robert Emmons, Alexis Abernethy, Denise Bellinger, Gail Ironson, Jeffery Dusek, Lee Berk, Douglas Nies, Sally Shaw, Sheryl Tyson, Jack Yu, Alice Parsons-Zulli, Kevin Reimer, Peter Hill, Everett Worthington Jr., Elizabeth Johnston-Taylor, Kenneth Wang, Julienne Bower, and Bruce Nelson.  Details for our 2017 Annual Symposium are still being developed, more to follow.

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Exciting new research in many interdisciplinary fields related to whole person care continues through the ETIP project umbrella, thanks in part to contributions from Adventist Health, Azusa Pacific University, Biola University, Duke University Center for Spirituality, Theology, and Health, Fuller Graduate School of Psychology, Glendale Adventist Medical Center, La Sierra University, Loma Linda University, White Memorial Medical Center, and Whole Person Resources.

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